Tight spaces by Robert Sommer

Tight spaces by Robert Sommer

Tight Spaces: Hard Architecture and How to Humanize it

 

Document Type: Book
Author: Robert Sommer
Publisher:  Prentice Hall
First edition: 1974
ISBN: 0139213465
ISBN13: 9780139213465

 

“Airports where chairs are bolted to the floor to drive patrons into food and drink concessions…picnic tables cemented into the earth, making large parties–or even sitting in the shade–impossible…public toilets, advertised as indestructible by manufacturers, those drive vandals to the use of dynamite in a desperate attempt at a human imprint.

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Integration and Implementation Insights

Integration and Implementation Insights

Integration and Implementation Insights

Document Type: Blog
Team Members:  Gabriele Bammer;
Peter Deane; David McDonald.
Link:
 i2insights.org

“Integration and Implementation Insights (also known as I2Insights) is a community weblog for researchers who are interested in better concepts and methods for understanding and acting on complex real-world problems – problems like refugee crises, global climate change, and inequality.

The blog is run by the Integration and Implementation Sciences team at The Australian National University. The team leader is Professor Gabriele Bammer. The blog is supported by a number of productive partnerships.”

The blog would interest researchers who are keen to look across the boundaries of their own expertise to exchange concepts and methods with those coming from other academic backgrounds and grappling with other problems and who wants to join the force to build a community which freely shares concepts and methods for dealing with complex problems, so that these become a stronger part of the mainstream of academic research and education.

Read this interesting article, ‘Three tasks for transdisciplinary bridge builders‘ by Roderick J. Lawrence on the blog.

 

“The blog discusses ways of dealing with:

  • synthesis of knowledge from different disciplines and stakeholders
  • the messiness of how components of a complex problem interact, how context can be all-important and how power can stymie or facilitate action.
  • the fact that complex problems do not have perfect solutions; instead that “best possible” or “least worst” solutions are more realistic aims.
  • unknowns in order to head-off, or better manage, unintended adverse consequences and unpleasant surprises
  • how research can best support policy and practice change
  • how to educate the next generation to better deal with complex problems
  • how to make effective ways of dealing with complex problems a more central part of the academic mainstream in both research and education.”

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